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Post Info TOPIC: Loads through Lefever Nitro Special


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Loads through Lefever Nitro Special
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Okay. First time writing on these blogs. My dad bought his first firearm which is a Lefever Nitro special. 12 gauge, 2 3/4 inch chambers, made in 1922 aparently, the number is 15563 or 115563 (Im pretty sure its 15563) and right barrel is modified and the left is full. I have been told not to shoot steel and I wont but waterfowling is a great sport and me and my father would love to hunt with a 98 year old gun. The gun is in pretty rough condition and most of the blueing is gon and has bad rust on the receiver. The discription may sound harsh but I still admire the firearm as it is a old gun. Now all that out of the way my question is can I shoot bismuth and or tungsten?? Any info will be appreciated.



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Yes as long as you don't have Damascus barrels on your firearm. Look and see if the words " Proof Steel " are on your barrels. If it says proof steel your all set.

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MarceySharkey06 wrote:

Okay. First time writing on these blogs. My dad bought his first firearm which is a Lefever Nitro special. 12 gauge, 2 3/4 inch chambers, made in 1922 aparently, the number is 15563 or 115563 (Im pretty sure its 15563) and right barrel is modified and the left is full. I have been told not to shoot steel and I wont but waterfowling is a great sport and me and my father would love to hunt with a 98 year old gun. The gun is in pretty rough condition and most of the blueing is gon and has bad rust on the receiver. The discription may sound harsh but I still admire the firearm as it is a old gun. Now all that out of the way my question is can I shoot bismuth and or tungsten?? Any info will be appreciated.


 Bismuth is fine, its the wood on these old gun you have to worry about, The heavy hot loads are bad to 100 year old stocks, shoot lighter duck loads of bismuth at 1200 to 1250 fps. with 1 1/8th oz of shot. you might have to reload them your self.

scott



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10gacrowshooter wrote:
MarceySharkey06 wrote:

Okay. First time writing on these blogs. My dad bought his first firearm which is a Lefever Nitro special. 12 gauge, 2 3/4 inch chambers, made in 1922 aparently, the number is 15563 or 115563 (Im pretty sure its 15563) and right barrel is modified and the left is full. I have been told not to shoot steel and I wont but waterfowling is a great sport and me and my father would love to hunt with a 98 year old gun. The gun is in pretty rough condition and most of the blueing is gon and has bad rust on the receiver. The discription may sound harsh but I still admire the firearm as it is a old gun. Now all that out of the way my question is can I shoot bismuth and or tungsten?? Any info will be appreciated.


 Bismuth is fine, its the wood on these old gun you have to worry about, The heavy hot loads are bad to 100 year old stocks, shoot lighter duck loads of bismuth at 1200 to 1250 fps. with 1 1/8th oz of shot. you might have to reload them your self.

scott


 A Lefever Nitro Special is not really a Lefever design, it was designed, built and sold by Ithaca.  As classic American doubles go it is not collectible and not worth a lot of money even when in excellent shape.  That doesn't mean it's not a good gun, it is.  If it was your Dad's gun you have something that exceeds monetary value, it's an heirloom gun and if Dad has passed you won't be getting another one.  For that reason alone I would repair and fix up whatever it is you are not happy with and not worry about return on investment, I would never sell it.  Scott is right about light loads being better for old guns and you will be surprised by how effect those light loads are when using a shot size with greater mass to make up for the lower velocity.  After awhile you will find yourself saying why did ever punish myself with so much recoil before shooting lighter loads.  Reloading bismuth is the way to go, factory light loads don't exist.  Reloading is fun and it expands your ammunition choices.  A good single stage MEC loader is easily found and relatively inexpensive.  Reloading recipes are available on the internet. Good luck and enjoy it.



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