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Post Info TOPIC: Fall 2020


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Fall 2020
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 We've gotten some hunts in this fall and had some fun. A couple were all day hunts and a handful of morning or afternoon shoots. I thought we had a good one lined up one day in mid-November, but the crows wanted no part of it. We packed up shortly before noon with 24 down and the rest avoiding us like the plague. Beaten to the spot I’m thinking.

 A week later we’d get 97 about a mile away. Same crows, different day, different place. Then a week after that we ran into educated crows again. This was a different area and it was like we were waving a red flag at them. They responded, then either skirted us or elevated out of range. We took a whipping that afternoon.

 I’ve never shot a piebald. On 20 November I had a chance. It was early afternoon and about ten or twelve came in nicely. We had a couple down when I saw him. Pure white from his neck along his body, under the wing to the end of his tail. Very obvious from one side, but one would never know it from the other. We passed up a couple shots hoping he’d swing into range. Finally I took a shot at 60+, but not having Dale, Demi or Assassin’s long range skills, I missed. On 1 December I had another chance. It was early afternoon in the middle a 135 bird shoot.  A group of about twenty came in and we'd shot a couple when my partner exclaimed, “piebald!” There he was, a real trophy. Brown with white spots and staying just out of range. He made a couple passes but never got close enough for a shot.

 

 We are between split seasons, but plan to venture over the state line a time or two before Iowa re-opens. Below are some random photos from this fall.

 Randy



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Very nice photos, when does you're season end or should I say when is it not worth going out anymore because of educated birds?

Bob A.

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Bob Aronsohn


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boba wrote:

Very nice photos, when does you're season end or should I say when is it not worth going out anymore because of educated birds?

Bob A.


 Hi Bob,

 Running into so many educated birds in Nov. surprised us some. It had me walking around our set up looking for a DO NOT APPROACH sign. I wonder if our nice fall didn't have something to do with it. Crops were out early, the ground was dry and a guy could get about anywhere he needed to be. That, coupled with the fact that it seems everybody has an electronic call maybe added up to more pressure.

 I don't like our split season, but one thing it does is give the crows a rest for forty five days. When it re-opens mid January, it's cold and there's usually enough snow on the ground to make it tough getting where you need to be. The weak of heart don't venture forth in those conditions to get a couple shots at a crow. The dead of winter is when we have the most time to hunt and there's plenty crows of around. 

 By mid February we can expect to find some that are re-educated, but then the migration starts and we usually have a couple more of weeks of good hunting. 

 If the number of crows dictate there could be a hunt and I don't think they've been shot at lately, we're willing to chance it. We're usually not much more than an hour from home, so taking a beating every so often isn't a big deal. I'd say the lack of crows ends our season before educated ones do.

 We've been taking a couple of longer trips each season and if we thought those birds were educated, we'd probably stay home.

 Hope you had a blessed Christmas and your season is going well. 

 Randy      



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Randy, my ole hunting buddy Jim Lundquist of Hopkin Minnesota (hunted with Jim from 1978 to 2000) used to say "I'd rather hunt 10,000 dumb ones than 100,000 smart ones" My other crow hunting buddy Boyd Robeson (my crow hunting mentor, he took me out of the dark ages) passed away 20 years ago today. I hunted with Boyd from 1974 to 1994 before he got dementia and could no longer hunt. He was only 67 years old when he had to quit and died 6 years later at 73. So the moral to this sad tale is, "get you're licks in while you still can"

On average how many hunts do you get in during a normal crow season?

Bob A.

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Bob Aronsohn


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Bob, 

 Seems like we never forget those that make an impression on us, or forget their meaningful quotes. 

 We averaged 24 hunts the last five seasons. That includes a few times we just go out a couple hours in the morning. 80% of our hunts are in January and February. In the winter we can most times plan our work around hunts. 

 If my health and body hold up, I should have a few years to really get my licks in after retirement.

 Randy



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 Another thing I've never done is shoot a quadruple. I had two chances on consecutive days in November. I was three or four days removed from educated crows and was itching for redemption. I planned to work on a couple hundred for an hour or so in the morning, then reconnoiter an area about twenty five miles away and if things looked good, set up for the following day.

 I was alone that morning and had a stiff breeze at my back. The crows would be about 600 yards downwind and I set up an excellent ambush for them. It worked perfectly, but was terribly slow. They came in two, three and four at a time. Mostly soft shooting. The largest group came in about an hour into the hunt, probably 7 or 8. I got the first one, got the second, missed the third and stoned the fourth. First botched quad.

 Although I was pleased about my set, I downed only 13. After I packed up I may have discovered why. A hog building was being pumped out two miles away with the manure being hauled another mile further. The crows were feeding there.

 The next morning I was again solo until about noon. It was mid-morning and I'd had slow but steady shooting when a group of 5-6 decoyed in nicely. There were three shots, then three thuds. I'd just finished reloading when about the same number came winging in. I stoned the first three and missed a fourth one, but got him on the fifth shot. Second botched quad on consecutive days.no

 My partner showed up a little after noon and we ended a good day with 97. 

 The below photo is of a pair of M12 Heavy Ducks I'm using this season. Both have solid ribs. One has been cut to 24" and threaded for choke tubes. She's the one I use most. The other has a 30" full choke barrel. With lead in their stock, a guy knows he's got something when he picks one up.

 

 Randy



-- Edited by Granite Jaw on Friday 1st of January 2021 05:33:52 AM

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Like your choice of pump guns there Randy😉

 

Ted



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I had fore ends like yours in the fore ground of you're photo put on my model 12's which were all stock shotguns right out of the box. Had Simmonds in Kansas City put vent ribs on both 20 gauges. I love the ole model 12's, great memories with them. I shot my first 50,000 crows with a pair of 20 gauge model 12 Winchesters from 1974 to 1990.

I was out last week and nature called and I had to go # 2 in 10 degree weather! Perhaps this is to much information Randy LOL.

Bob A.

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Bob Aronsohn


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M12Shooter wrote:

Like your choice of pump guns there Randy😉

 

Ted


 Ted,

 Forty years with the Wingmaster so I'm having trouble getting used to the safety and slide release being on opposite ends of the trigger guard. Practiced exclusively with M12's from late summer on, but twice this season I've failed to have the safety off. Muscle memory is hard to overcome, especially during live action. Happy New Year.

 Randy



-- Edited by Granite Jaw on Sunday 3rd of January 2021 09:50:10 PM

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boba wrote:

I had fore ends like yours in the fore ground of you're photo put on my model 12's which were all stock shotguns right out of the box. Had Simmonds in Kansas City put vent ribs on both 20 gauges. I love the ole model 12's, great memories with them. I shot my first 50,000 crows with a pair of 20 gauge model 12 Winchesters from 1974 to 1990.

I was out last week and nature called and I had to go # 2 in 10 degree weather! Perhaps this is to much information Randy LOL.

Bob A.


 Bob,

 Success before departure is key.biggrin  Otherwise one is searching for a down tree and a corn cob. At ten degrees those cobs are mighty cold. 

 Randy



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Randy,

Good post and pictures! Due to the holidays and an extremely busy pace at work, I’ve been a stranger to the site. Your photos of the clouds of crows gave me an itchy finger.

The Model 12s picture is also nice. Always wanted to own one. What a reputation they have rightfully earned!

Good hunting when your season re-opens.

Demi


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